HTTP Status Codes

REST APIs use the Status-Line part of an HTTP response message to inform clients of their request’s overarching result. RFC 2616 defines the Status-Line syntax as shown below:

Status-Line = HTTP-Version SP Status-Code SP Reason-Phrase CRLF

HTTP defines these standard status codes that can be used to convey the results of a client’s request. The status codes are divided into five categories.

Немного личного опыта

HTTP Status Codes

Если есть возможность, изначально почистить все контакты ЦП, ОЗУ, Видеокарты спиртом. Осмотреть сокет на предмет поврежденных ножек. Бывают ситуации когда все запускается без проблем, но в процессе эксплуатации то проблема с памятью, то с видеокартой, соответственно уходим в синий экран и.т.д. Это как правило как раз и есть грязные контакты на процессоре.

Стоит учитывать, что процессоры LGA 2011 Б/У и их хранение и упаковка далеко не заводского формата. Бывает чистишь контакты спиртом, а на тампоне в результате черная грязь образуется.

FF — Это очень обширная ситуация. Дело не доходит даже до инициализации BIOS. Его просто нет:) Бывает так что слетает сама микропрограмма (очень актуальная для плат X79T v1.03) Решение: прошивка с помощью программатора CH341A. Циклически запускается FF и отключается и так пока не отключить питание. Залита неудачная прошивка в плату. Решение: также прошивка программатором CH341A.

Что касается ошибки 73, то в таблице указано возможное решение, при условии если система вообще ни в какую не хочет стартовать. Если ее словили с системой под анлоком, после сна или в процессе работы компьютера, то как правило, на работоспособность ПК это никак не влияет. Например, после полного запуска системы отбил пост код АА, а потом через определенное время заметили уже 73. При этом вся система работает в штатном режиме.

REST Specific HTTP Status Codes

It indicates that the REST API successfully carried out whatever action the client requested and that no more specific code in the 2xx series is appropriate.

Unlike the 204 status code, a 200 response should include a response body. The information returned with the response is dependent on the method used in the request, for example:

201 (Created)

A REST API responds with the 201 status code whenever a resource is created inside a collection. There may also be times when a new resource is created as a result of some controller action, in which case 201 would also be an appropriate response.

The newly created resource can be referenced by the URI(s) returned in the entity of the response, with the most specific URI for the resource given by a Location header field.

The origin server MUST create the resource before returning the 201 status code. If the action cannot be carried out immediately, the server SHOULD respond with a 202 (Accepted) response instead.

202 (Accepted)

A 202 response is typically used for actions that take a long while to process. It indicates that the request has been accepted for processing, but the processing has not been completed. The request might or might not be eventually acted upon, or even maybe disallowed when processing occurs.

204 (No Content)

The 204 status code is usually sent out in response to a PUT, POST, or DELETE request when the REST API declines to send back any status message or representation in the response message’s body.

An API may also send 204 in conjunction with a GET request to indicate that the requested resource exists, but has no state representation to include in the body.

The 204 response MUST NOT include a message-body and thus is always terminated by the first empty line after the header fields.

301 (Moved Permanently)

The 301 status code indicates that the REST API’s resource model has been significantly redesigned, and a new permanent URI has been assigned to the client’s requested resource. The REST API should specify the new URI in the response’s Location header, and all future requests should be directed to the given URI.

You will hardly use this response code in your API as you can always use the API versioning for the new API while retaining the old one.

302 (Found)

Many web browsers implemented this code in a manner that violated this standard, changing the request type of the new request to GET, regardless of the type employed in the original request (e.g., POST). RFC 1945 and RFC 2068 specify that the client is not allowed to change the method on the redirected request. The status codes 303 and 307 have been added for servers that wish to make unambiguously clear which kind of reaction is expected of the client.

303 (See Other)

A 303 response indicates that a controller resource has finished its work, but instead of sending a potentially unwanted response body, it sends the client the URI of a response resource. The response can be the URI of the temporary status message, or the URI to some already existing, more permanent, resource.

Generally speaking, the 303 status code allows a REST API to send a reference to a resource without forcing the client to download its state. Instead, the client may send a GET request to the value of the Location header.

The 303 response MUST NOT be cached, but the response to the second (redirected) request might be cacheable.

304 (Not Modified)

This status code is similar to 204 (“No Content”) in that the response body must be empty. The critical distinction is that 204 is used when there is nothing to send in the body, whereas 304 is used when the resource has not been modified since the version specified by the request headers If-Modified-Since or If-None-Match.

In such a case, there is no need to retransmit the resource since the client still has a previously-downloaded copy.

Using this saves bandwidth and reprocessing on both the server and client, as only the header data must be sent and received in comparison to the entirety of the page being re-processed by the server, then sent again using more bandwidth of the server and client.

307 (Temporary Redirect)

A 307 response indicates that the REST API is not going to process the client’s request. Instead, the client should resubmit the request to the URI specified by the response message’s Location header. However, future requests should still use the original URI.

A REST API can use this status code to assign a temporary URI to the client’s requested resource. For example, a 307 response can be used to shift a client request over to another host.

400 (Bad Request)

400 is the generic client-side error status, used when no other 4xx error code is appropriate. Errors can be like malformed request syntax, invalid request message parameters, or deceptive request routing etc.

The client SHOULD NOT repeat the request without modifications.

401 (Unauthorized)

A 401 error response indicates that the client tried to operate on a protected resource without providing the proper authorization. It may have provided the wrong credentials or none at all. The response must include a WWW-Authenticate header field containing a challenge applicable to the requested resource.

403 (Forbidden)

Authentication will not help, and the request SHOULD NOT be repeated. Unlike a 401 Unauthorized response, authenticating will make no difference.

404 (Not Found)

The 404 error status code indicates that the REST API can’t map the client’s URI to a resource but may be available in the future. Subsequent requests by the client are permissible.

No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address. This status code is commonly used when the server does not wish to reveal exactly why the request has been refused, or when no other response is applicable.

405 (Method Not Allowed)

The API responds with a 405 error to indicate that the client tried to use an HTTP method that the resource does not allow. For instance, a read-only resource could support only GET and HEAD, while a controller resource might allow GET and POST, but not PUT or DELETE.

A 405 response must include the Allow header, which lists the HTTP methods that the resource supports. For example:

Allow: GET, POST

406 (Not Acceptable)

The 406 error response indicates that the API is not able to generate any of the client’s preferred media types, as indicated by the Accept request header. For example, a client request for data formatted as application/xml will receive a 406 response if the API is only willing to format data as application/json.

412 (Precondition Failed)

The 412 error response indicates that the client specified one or more preconditions in its request headers, effectively telling the REST API to carry out its request only if certain conditions were met. A 412 response indicates that those conditions were not met, so instead of carrying out the request, the API sends this status code.

415 (Unsupported Media Type)

The 415 error response indicates that the API is not able to process the client’s supplied media type, as indicated by the Content-Type request header. For example, a client request including data formatted as application/xml will receive a 415 response if the API is only willing to process data formatted as application/json.

For example, the client uploads an image as image/svg+xml, but the server requires that images use a different format.

500 is the generic REST API error response. Most web frameworks automatically respond with this response status code whenever they execute some request handler code that raises an exception.

A 500 error is never the client’s fault, and therefore, it is reasonable for the client to retry the same request that triggered this response and hope to get a different response.

The API response is the generic error message, given when an unexpected condition was encountered and no more specific message is suitable.

501 (Not Implemented)

The server either does not recognize the request method, or it cannot fulfill the request. Usually, this implies future availability (e.g., a new feature of a web-service API).

1xx Informational

This class of status code indicates a provisional response, consisting only of the Status-Line and optional headers, and is terminated by an empty line. There are no required headers for this class of status code. Since HTTP/1.0 did not define any 1xx status codes, servers MUST NOT send a 1xx response to an HTTP/1.0 client except under experimental conditions.

Proxies MUST forward 1xx responses, unless the connection between the proxy and its client has been closed, or unless the proxy itself requested the generation of the 1xx response. (For example, if a proxy adds a “Expect: 100-continue” field when it forwards a request, then it need not forward the corresponding 100 (Continue) response(s).)

Wikipedia

Request received, continuing process.

This class of status code indicates a provisional response, consisting only of the Status-Line and optional headers, and is terminated by an empty line. Since HTTP/1.0 did not define any 1xx status codes, servers must not send a 1xx response to an HTTP/1.0 client except under experimental conditions.

The client SHOULD continue with its request. This interim response is used to inform the client that the initial part of the request has been received and has not yet been rejected by the server. The client SHOULD continue by sending the remainder of the request or, if the request has already been completed, ignore this response. The server MUST send a final response after the request has been completed. See section 8.2.3 for detailed discussion of the use and handling of this status code.

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This means that the server has received the request headers, and that the client should proceed to send the request body (in the case of a request for which a body needs to be sent; for example, a POST request). If the request body is large, sending it to a server when a request has already been rejected based upon inappropriate headers is inefficient. To have a server check if the request could be accepted based on the request’s headers alone, a client must send Expect: 100-continue as a header in its initial request and check if a 100 Continue status code is received in response before continuing (or receive 417 Expectation Failed and not continue).

101 Switching Protocols

The server understands and is willing to comply with the client’s request, via the Upgrade message header field (section 14.42), for a change in the application protocol being used on this connection. The server will switch protocols to those defined by the response’s Upgrade header field immediately after the empty line which terminates the 101 response.

The protocol SHOULD be switched only when it is advantageous to do so. For example, switching to a newer version of HTTP is advantageous over older versions, and switching to a real-time, synchronous protocol might be advantageous when delivering resources that use such features.

This means the requester has asked the server to switch protocols and the server is acknowledging that it will do so.

102 Processing (WebDAV)

The 102 (Processing) status code is an interim response used to inform the client that the server has accepted the complete request, but has not yet completed it. This status code SHOULD only be sent when the server has a reasonable expectation that the request will take significant time to complete. As guidance, if a method is taking longer than 20 seconds (a reasonable, but arbitrary value) to process the server SHOULD return a 102 (Processing) response. The server MUST send a final response after the request has been completed.

Methods can potentially take a long period of time to process, especially methods that support the Depth header. In such cases the client may time-out the connection while waiting for a response. To prevent this the server may return a 102 (Processing) status code to indicate to the client that the server is still processing the method.

As a WebDAV request may contain many sub-requests involving file operations, it may take a long time to complete the request. This code indicates that the server has received and is processing the request, but no response is available yet. This prevents the client from timing out and assuming the request was lost.

1xx Status Codes [Informational]

This class of status code indicates that the client’s request was successfully received, understood, and accepted.

This class of status codes indicates the action requested by the client was received, understood, accepted and processed successfully.

The request has succeeded. The information returned with the response is dependent on the method used in the request, for example:

Standard response for successful HTTP requests. The actual response will depend on the request method used. In a GET request, the response will contain an entity corresponding to the requested resource. In a POST request the response will contain an entity describing or containing the result of the action.

General status code. Most common code used to indicate success.

A 201 response MAY contain an ETag response header field indicating the current value of the entity tag for the requested variant just created, see section 14.19.

The request has been fulfilled and resulted in a new resource being created.

Successful creation occurred (via either POST or PUT). Set the Location header to contain a link to the newly-created resource (on POST). Response body content may or may not be present.

The request has been accepted for processing, but the processing has not been completed. The request might or might not eventually be acted upon, as it might be disallowed when processing actually takes place. There is no facility for re-sending a status code from an asynchronous operation such as this.

203 Non-Authoritative Information

The returned metainformation in the entity-header is not the definitive set as available from the origin server, but is gathered from a local or a third-party copy. The set presented MAY be a subset or superset of the original version. For example, including local annotation information about the resource might result in a superset of the metainformation known by the origin server. Use of this response code is not required and is only appropriate when the response would otherwise be 200 (OK).

The server successfully processed the request, but is returning information that may be from another source.

Not present in HTTP/1.0: available since HTTP/1.1

204 No Content

The server has fulfilled the request but does not need to return an entity-body, and might want to return updated metainformation. The response MAY include new or updated metainformation in the form of entity-headers, which if present SHOULD be associated with the requested variant.

The 204 response MUST NOT include a message-body, and thus is always terminated by the first empty line after the header fields.

The server successfully processed the request, but is not returning any content.

Status when wrapped responses (e.g. JSEND) are not used and nothing is in the body (e.g. DELETE).

205 Reset Content

The server successfully processed the request, but is not returning any content. Unlike a 204 response, this response requires that the requester reset the document view.

206 Partial Content

The server has fulfilled the partial GET request for the resource. The request MUST have included a Range header field (section 14.35) indicating the desired range, and MAY have included an If-Range header field (section 14.27) to make the request conditional.

If the 206 response is the result of an If-Range request that used a strong cache validator (see section 13.3.3), the response SHOULD NOT include other entity-headers. If the response is the result of an If-Range request that used a weak validator, the response MUST NOT include other entity-headers; this prevents inconsistencies between cached entity-bodies and updated headers. Otherwise, the response MUST include all of the entity-headers that would have been returned with a 200 (OK) response to the same request.

A cache MUST NOT combine a 206 response with other previously cached content if the ETag or Last-Modified headers do not match exactly, see 13.5.4.

A cache that does not support the Range and Content-Range headers MUST NOT cache 206 (Partial) responses.

The server is delivering only part of the resource due to a range header sent by the client. The range header is used by tools like wget to enable resuming of interrupted downloads, or split a download into multiple simultaneous streams.

207 Multi-Status (WebDAV)

208 Already Reported (WebDAV)

The 208 (Already Reported) status code can be used inside a DAV: propstat response element to avoid enumerating the internal members of multiple bindings to the same collection repeatedly. For each binding to a collection inside the request’s scope, only one will be reported with a 200 status, while subsequent DAV:response elements for all other bindings will use the 208 status, and no DAV:response elements for their descendants are included.

The members of a DAV binding have already been enumerated in a previous reply to this request, and are not being included again.

226 IM Used

The request MUST have included an A-IM header field listing at least one instance-manipulation. The response MUST include an Etag header field giving the entity tag of the current instance.

A response received with a status code of 226 MAY be stored by a cache and used in reply to a subsequent request, subject to the HTTP expiration mechanism and any Cache-Control headers, and to the requirements in section 10.6.

A response received with a status code of 226 MAY be used by a cache, in conjunction with a cache entry for the base instance, to create a cache entry for the current instance.

The server has fulfilled a GET request for the resource, and the response is a representation of the result of one or more instance-manipulations applied to the current instance.

The server failed to fulfill an apparently valid request.

500 Internal Server Error

The server encountered an unexpected condition which prevented it from fulfilling the request.

A generic error message, given when no more specific message is suitable.

The general catch-all error when the server-side throws an exception.

501 Not Implemented

The server does not support the functionality required to fulfill the request. This is the appropriate response when the server does not recognize the request method and is not capable of supporting it for any resource.

The server either does not recognise the request method, or it lacks the ability to fulfill the request.

502 Bad Gateway

The server, while acting as a gateway or proxy, received an invalid response from the upstream server it accessed in attempting to fulfill the request.

The server was acting as a gateway or proxy and received an invalid response from the upstream server.

503 Service Unavailable

The server is currently unable to handle the request due to a temporary overloading or maintenance of the server. The implication is that this is a temporary condition which will be alleviated after some delay. If known, the length of the delay MAY be indicated in a Retry-After header. If no Retry-After is given, the client SHOULD handle the response as it would for a 500 response.

Note: The existence of the 503 status code does not imply that a server must use it when becoming overloaded. Some servers may wish to simply refuse the connection.

The server is currently unavailable (because it is overloaded or down for maintenance). Generally, this is a temporary state.

504 Gateway Timeout

The server, while acting as a gateway or proxy, did not receive a timely response from the upstream server specified by the URI (e.g. HTTP, FTP, LDAP) or some other auxiliary server (e.g. DNS) it needed to access in attempting to complete the request.

Note: Note to implementors: some deployed proxies are known to return 400 or 500 when DNS lookups time out.

The server was acting as a gateway or proxy and did not receive a timely response from the upstream server.

505 HTTP Version Not Supported

The server does not support, or refuses to support, the HTTP protocol version that was used in the request message. The server is indicating that it is unable or unwilling to complete the request using the same major version as the client, as described in section 3.1, other than with this error message. The response SHOULD contain an entity describing why that version is not supported and what other protocols are supported by that server.

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The server does not support the HTTP protocol version used in the request.

506 Variant Also Negotiates (Experimental)

The 506 status code indicates that the server has an internal configuration error: the chosen variant resource is configured to engage in transparent content negotiation itself, and is therefore not a proper end point in the negotiation process.

Transparent content negotiation for the request results in a circular reference.

507 Insufficient Storage (WebDAV)

The server is unable to store the representation needed to complete the request.

508 Loop Detected (WebDAV)

The 508 (Loop Detected) status code indicates that the server terminated an operation because it encountered an infinite loop while processing a request with “Depth: infinity”. This status indicates that the entire operation failed.

The server detected an infinite loop while processing the request (sent in lieu of 208).

510 Not Extended

The policy for accessing the resource has not been met in the request. The server should send back all the information necessary for the client to issue an extended request. It is outside the scope of this specification to specify how the extensions inform the client.

Further extensions to the request are required for the server to fulfill it.

511 Network Authentication Required

The 511 status code indicates that the client needs to authenticate to gain network access.

Note that the 511 response SHOULD NOT contain a challenge or the login interface itself, because browsers would show the login interface as being associated with the originally requested URL, which may cause confusion.

The 511 status SHOULD NOT be generated by origin servers; it is intended for use by intercepting proxies that are interposed as a means of controlling access to the network.

Responses with the 511 status code MUST NOT be stored by a cache.

The 511 status code is designed to mitigate problems caused by “captive portals” to software (especially non-browser agents) that is expecting a response from the server that a request was made to, not the intervening network infrastructure. It is not intended to encouraged deployment of captive portals, only to limit the damage caused by them.

However, these risks are not unique to the 511 status code; in other words, a captive portal that is not using this status code introduces the same issues.

Also, note that captive portals using this status code on an SSL or TLS connection (commonly, port 443) will generate a certificate error on the client.

The client needs to authenticate to gain network access. Intended for use by intercepting proxies used to control access to the network (e.g., “captive portals” used to require agreement to Terms of Service before granting full Internet access via a Wi-Fi hotspot).

598 Network read timeout error

This status code is not specified in any RFCs, but is used by some HTTP proxies to signal a network read timeout behind the proxy to a client in front of the proxy.

599 Network connect timeout error

This status code is not specified in any RFCs, but is used by some HTTP proxies to signal a network connect timeout behind the proxy to a client in front of the proxy.

“Top 10” HTTP Status Code. More REST service-specific information is contained in the entry.

3xx Status Codes [Redirection]

If the client is sending data, a server implementation using TCP SHOULD be careful to ensure that the client acknowledges receipt of the packet(s) containing the response, before the server closes the input connection. If the client continues sending data to the server after the close, the server’s TCP stack will send a reset packet to the client, which may erase the client’s unacknowledged input buffers before they can be read and interpreted by the HTTP application.

400 Bad Request

The request could not be understood by the server due to malformed syntax. The client SHOULD NOT repeat the request without modifications.

The request cannot be fulfilled due to bad syntax.

General error when fulfilling the request would cause an invalid state. Domain validation errors, missing data, etc. are some examples.

Similar to 403 Forbidden, but specifically for use when authentication is possible but has failed or not yet been provided. The response must include a WWW-Authenticate header field containing a challenge applicable to the requested resource. See Basic access authentication and Digest access authentication.

Error code response for missing or invalid authentication token.

402 Payment Required

This code is reserved for future use.

Reserved for future use. The original intention was that this code might be used as part of some form of digital cash or micropayment scheme, but that has not happened, and this code is not usually used. As an example of its use, however, Apple’s MobileMe service generates a 402 error (“httpStatusCode:402” in the Mac OS X Console log) if the MobileMe account is delinquent.

The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfill it. Authorization will not help and the request SHOULD NOT be repeated. If the request method was not HEAD and the server wishes to make public why the request has not been fulfilled, it SHOULD describe the reason for the refusal in the entity. If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 404 (Not Found) can be used instead.

The request was a legal request, but the server is refusing to respond to it. Unlike a 401 Unauthorized response, authenticating will make no difference.

404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address. This status code is commonly used when the server does not wish to reveal exactly why the request has been refused, or when no other response is applicable.

The requested resource could not be found but may be available again in the future. Subsequent requests by the client are permissible.

Used when the requested resource is not found, whether it doesn’t exist or if there was a 401 or 403 that, for security reasons, the service wants to mask.

405 Method Not Allowed

The method specified in the Request-Line is not allowed for the resource identified by the Request-URI. The response MUST include an Allow header containing a list of valid methods for the requested resource.

A request was made of a resource using a request method not supported by that resource; for example, using GET on a form which requires data to be presented via POST, or using PUT on a read-only resource.

406 Not Acceptable

The resource identified by the request is only capable of generating response entities which have content characteristics not acceptable according to the accept headers sent in the request.

The requested resource is only capable of generating content not acceptable according to the Accept headers sent in the request.

407 Proxy Authentication Required

This code is similar to 401 (Unauthorized), but indicates that the client must first authenticate itself with the proxy. The proxy MUST return a Proxy-Authenticate header field (section 14.33) containing a challenge applicable to the proxy for the requested resource. The client MAY repeat the request with a suitable Proxy-Authorization header field (section 14.34). HTTP access authentication is explained in “HTTP Authentication: Basic and Digest Access Authentication”.

408 Request Timeout

The client did not produce a request within the time that the server was prepared to wait. The client MAY repeat the request without modifications at any later time.

The server timed out waiting for the request. According to W3 HTTP specifications: “The client did not produce a request within the time that the server was prepared to wait. The client MAY repeat the request without modifications at any later time.”

Conflicts are most likely to occur in response to a PUT request. For example, if versioning were being used and the entity being PUT included changes to a resource which conflict with those made by an earlier (third-party) request, the server might use the 409 response to indicate that it can’t complete the request. In this case, the response entity would likely contain a list of the differences between the two versions in a format defined by the response Content-Type.

Indicates that the request could not be processed because of conflict in the request, such as an edit conflict.

Whenever a resource conflict would be caused by fulfilling the request. Duplicate entries and deleting root objects when cascade-delete is not supported are a couple of examples.

The 410 response is primarily intended to assist the task of web maintenance by notifying the recipient that the resource is intentionally unavailable and that the server owners desire that remote links to that resource be removed. Such an event is common for limited-time, promotional services and for resources belonging to individuals no longer working at the server’s site. It is not necessary to mark all permanently unavailable resources as “gone” or to keep the mark for any length of time — that is left to the discretion of the server owner.

Indicates that the resource requested is no longer available and will not be available again. This should be used when a resource has been intentionally removed and the resource should be purged. Upon receiving a 410 status code, the client should not request the resource again in the future. Clients such as search engines should remove the resource from their indices. Most use cases do not require clients and search engines to purge the resource, and a “404 Not Found” may be used instead.

411 Length Required

The server refuses to accept the request without a defined Content- Length. The client MAY repeat the request if it adds a valid Content-Length header field containing the length of the message-body in the request message.

The request did not specify the length of its content, which is required by the requested resource.

412 Precondition Failed

The precondition given in one or more of the request-header fields evaluated to false when it was tested on the server. This response code allows the client to place preconditions on the current resource metainformation (header field data) and thus prevent the requested method from being applied to a resource other than the one intended.

The server does not meet one of the preconditions that the requester put on the request.

413 Request Entity Too Large

The server is refusing to process a request because the request entity is larger than the server is willing or able to process. The server MAY close the connection to prevent the client from continuing the request.

If the condition is temporary, the server SHOULD include a Retry- After header field to indicate that it is temporary and after what time the client MAY try again.

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The request is larger than the server is willing or able to process.

414 Request-URI Too Long

The server is refusing to service the request because the Request-URI is longer than the server is willing to interpret. This rare condition is only likely to occur when a client has improperly converted a POST request to a GET request with long query information, when the client has descended into a URI “black hole” of redirection (e.g., a redirected URI prefix that points to a suffix of itself), or when the server is under attack by a client attempting to exploit security holes present in some servers using fixed-length buffers for reading or manipulating the Request-URI.

The URI provided was too long for the server to process.

416 Requested Range Not Satisfiable

A server SHOULD return a response with this status code if a request included a Range request-header field (section 14.35), and none of the range-specifier values in this field overlap the current extent of the selected resource, and the request did not include an If-Range request-header field. (For byte-ranges, this means that the first- byte-pos of all of the byte-range-spec values were greater than the current length of the selected resource.)

When this status code is returned for a byte-range request, the response SHOULD include a Content-Range entity-header field specifying the current length of the selected resource (see section 14.16). This response MUST NOT use the multipart/byteranges content- type.

The client has asked for a portion of the file, but the server cannot supply that portion. For example, if the client asked for a part of the file that lies beyond the end of the file.

The expectation given in an Expect request-header field (see section 14.20) could not be met by this server, or, if the server is a proxy, the server has unambiguous evidence that the request could not be met by the next-hop server.

The server cannot meet the requirements of the Expect request-header field.

418 I’m a teapot (RFC 2324)

This code was defined in 1998 as one of the traditional IETF April Fools’ jokes, in RFC 2324, Hyper Text Coffee Pot Control Protocol, and is not expected to be implemented by actual HTTP servers. However, known implementations do exist. An Nginx HTTP server uses this code to simulate goto-like behaviour in its configuration.

422 Unprocessable Entity (WebDAV)

The 422 (Unprocessable Entity) status code means the server understands the content type of the request entity (hence a 415(Unsupported Media Type) status code is inappropriate), and the syntax of the request entity is correct (thus a 400 (Bad Request) status code is inappropriate) but was unable to process the contained instructions. For example, this error condition may occur if an XML request body contains well-formed (i.e., syntactically correct), but semantically erroneous, XML instructions.

423 Locked (WebDAV)

The 423 (Locked) status code means the source or destination resource of a method is locked. This response SHOULD contain an appropriate precondition or postcondition code, such as ‘lock-token-submitted’ or ‘no-conflicting-lock’.

The resource that is being accessed is locked.

424 Failed Dependency (WebDAV)

The 424 (Failed Dependency) status code means that the method could not be performed on the resource because the requested action depended on another action and that action failed. For example, if a command in a PROPPATCH method fails, then, at minimum, the rest of the commands will also fail with 424 (Failed Dependency).

The request failed due to failure of a previous request (e.g. a PROPPATCH).

425 Reserved for WebDAV

Slein, J., Whitehead, E.J., et al., “WebDAV Advanced Collections Protocol”, Work In Progress.

Defined in drafts of “WebDAV Advanced Collections Protocol”, but not present in “Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV) Ordered Collections Protocol”.

426 Upgrade Required

Reliable, interoperable negotiation of Upgrade features requires an unambiguous failure signal. The 426 Upgrade Required status code allows a server to definitively state the precise protocol extensions a given resource must be served with.

The client should switch to a different protocol such as TLS/1.0.

428 Precondition Required

The 428 status code indicates that the origin server requires the request to be conditional.

Its typical use is to avoid the “lost update” problem, where a client GETs a resource’s state, modifies it, and PUTs it back to the server, when meanwhile a third party has modified the state on the server, leading to a conflict. By requiring requests to be conditional, the server can assure that clients are working with the correct copies.

Responses using this status code SHOULD explain how to resubmit the request successfully.

The 428 status code is optional; clients cannot rely upon its use to prevent “lost update” conflicts.

The origin server requires the request to be conditional. Intended to prevent “the “lost update” problem, where a client GETs a resource’s state, modifies it, and PUTs it back to the server, when meanwhile a third party has modified the state on the server, leading to a conflict.

429 Too Many Requests

The response representations SHOULD include details explaining the condition, and MAY include a Retry-After header indicating how long to wait before making a new request.

When a server is under attack or just receiving a very large number of requests from a single party, responding to each with a 429 status code will consume resources.

Therefore, servers are not required to use the 429 status code; when limiting resource usage, it may be more appropriate to just drop connections, or take other steps.

444 No Response (Nginx)

449 Retry With (Microsoft)

A Microsoft extension. The request should be retried after performing the appropriate action.

451 Unavailable For Legal Reasons

499 Client Closed Request (Nginx)

An Nginx HTTP server extension. This code is introduced to log the case when the connection is closed by client while HTTP server is processing its request, making server unable to send the HTTP header back.

3xx Redirection

Note: previous versions of this specification recommended a maximum of five redirections. Content developers should be aware that there might be clients that implement such a fixed limitation.

The client must take additional action to complete the request.

300 Multiple Choices

301 Moved Permanently

The requested resource has been assigned a new permanent URI and any future references to this resource SHOULD use one of the returned URIs. Clients with link editing capabilities ought to automatically re-link references to the Request-URI to one or more of the new references returned by the server, where possible. This response is cacheable unless indicated otherwise.

The new permanent URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s).

This and all future requests should be directed to the given URI.

The requested resource resides temporarily under a different URI. Since the redirection might be altered on occasion, the client SHOULD continue to use the Request-URI for future requests. This response is only cacheable if indicated by a Cache-Control or Expires header field.

The temporary URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s).

303 See Other

The different URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s).

The response to the request can be found under another URI using a GET method. When received in response to a POST (or PUT/DELETE), it should be assumed that the server has received the data and the redirect should be issued with a separate GET message.

304 Not Modified

If the client has performed a conditional GET request and access is allowed, but the document has not been modified, the server SHOULD respond with this status code. The 304 response MUST NOT contain a message-body, and thus is always terminated by the first empty line after the header fields.

If the conditional GET used a strong cache validator (see section 13.3.3), the response SHOULD NOT include other entity-headers. Otherwise (i.e., the conditional GET used a weak validator), the response MUST NOT include other entity-headers; this prevents inconsistencies between cached entity-bodies and updated headers.

If a 304 response indicates an entity not currently cached, then the cache MUST disregard the response and repeat the request without the conditional.

If a cache uses a received 304 response to update a cache entry, the cache MUST update the entry to reflect any new field values given in the response.

Indicates the resource has not been modified since last requested. Typically, the HTTP client provides a header like the If-Modified-Since header to provide a time against which to compare. Using this saves bandwidth and reprocessing on both the server and client, as only the header data must be sent and received in comparison to the entirety of the page being re-processed by the server, then sent again using more bandwidth of the server and client.

Used for conditional GET calls to reduce band-width usage. If used, must set the Date, Content-Location, ETag headers to what they would have been on a regular GET call. There must be no body on the response.

305 Use Proxy

The requested resource MUST be accessed through the proxy given by the Location field. The Location field gives the URI of the proxy. The recipient is expected to repeat this single request via the proxy. 305 responses MUST only be generated by origin servers.

Note: RFC 2068 was not clear that 305 was intended to redirect a single request, and to be generated by origin servers only. Not observing these limitations has significant security consequences.

Many HTTP clients (such as Mozilla and Internet Explorer) do not correctly handle responses with this status code, primarily for security reasons.

The 306 status code was used in a previous version of the specification, is no longer used, and the code is reserved.

No longer used. Originally meant “Subsequent requests should use the specified proxy.”

307 Temporary Redirect

The requested resource resides temporarily under a different URI. Since the redirection MAY be altered on occasion, the client SHOULD continue to use the Request-URI for future requests. This response is only cacheable if indicated by a Cache-Control or Expires header field.

In this case, the request should be repeated with another URI; however, future requests can still use the original URI. In contrast to 302, the request method should not be changed when reissuing the original request. For instance, a POST request must be repeated using another POST request.

308 Permanent Redirect (experimental)

The request, and all future requests should be repeated using another URI. 307 and 308 (as proposed) parallel the behaviours of 302 and 301, but do not require the HTTP method to change. So, for example, submitting a form to a permanently redirected resource may continue smoothly.

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